Remembering Tracy Maddox, Hollywood actress, realtor, cookbook author, animal lover

A “warrior for animals.” Maddox believed non-violence toward all living beings was mankind’s only hope for a sustainable future.

Tracy Maddox. Credit: Chris Clark

Tracy Maddox passed away from cancer on May 30 in Oakland. She was surrounded by her friends Chris Clark, Derek Moulaison, Megan Micco and Shannon Mitchell.

She had put up a valiant fight against breast cancer and went into remission for a few years, however several months ago the cancer returned and metastasized to her liver. She is survived by her beloved dog Emma.

She was a well respected actress who had appeared in significant roles in television shows like Grey’s Anatomy, The Event and The Practice.  Anyone who has attempted to get work as an actor knows how hard this can be in Hollywood. Yet Tracy succeeded, doing thankless necessary roles and working hard for years.  Her move to the Bay Area had Tracy turning over a new leaf and becoming a realtor, and last year, she was able to purchase a home of her own, succeeding in one of her many dreams.

There were so many sides to Tracy — she was a dedicated vegan, believing in non-violence towards all beings and even wrote a cookbook called The Living Vegan HCG Cookbook.  

She was a talented writer and participated in a writer’s group, called Writing by Writers, that was a great solace to her in these past few months. She was grateful for her many friendships through this group.

Tracy was a very private person.  She was originally from Memphis, Tennessee, and was extremely close to her grandmother Georgia. Her grandfather was a fine craftsman and everyone in her family built and designed their own homes, so perhaps the love of houses and real estate was in her blood.

I think most important to Tracy was her love of animals. She was a warrior for animals. She mourned the passing of her beloved dogs Finley and Murphy. She believed that non-violence toward all living beings was mankind’s only hope for a sustainable future. 

Tracy didn’t want any sort of service.  If you want to do something, please make a donation to an animal rescue organization in Tracy, Finley and Murphy’s memory — such as Hop-a-Long Rescue, where Tracy made donations after she closed any transaction, Berkeley Humane, the Milo Foundation or Rocket Dog Rescue.

Here is a poem I think Tracy would have loved:

He puts his cheek against mine
and makes small, expressive sounds.
And when I’m awake, or awake enough

he turns upside down, his four paws

in the air
and his eyes dark and fervent.

“Tell me you love me,” he says.

“Tell me again.”

Could there be a sweeter arrangement? Over and over
he gets to ask.
I get to tell.

— Dog Songs by Mary Oliver